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, and convincing these middle- class people that government had been identified with the interests of minorities and the poor and was not working for them anymore and luring them over to become the republican base. that title gets a lot of attention, because we have seen such a rationalized -- such a campaign, particularly as mitt romney and paul ryan use welface that is -- use a version of welfare that is blackface. it may not be working for them. tavis: the subtitle is no less provocative. "why we long for a golden age that never was." a majority of americans that believe our best days are behind us. there are many who believe that maybe the 21st century belongs to china or somebody else. it ain't ours. what do you say to that? >> the tragic thing about this is that there is a loss of confidence in the future. there was a golden age for a lot of white people. not all. but when i tell the story with my family, i show how my grandparents climbed out of desperate poverty in the depression into the middle class really in one generation, and some of their children proceeded into what may be called
, the rebels have been using to get a sense of what is going on. you can see what the government response has ben, massive firepower to crush the rebellion. the rebels and residents have no answer to a barrage of artillery that does not discriminate between the fighter and civilian. the fighters tried to move on seen towards loyalists forces. despite its overwhelming strength come the government forces have made few inroads. we were shown one of their check points, just 200 meters away. they may be fighting for the future of syria, but both sides are struggling over small bits of turf. the empty streets are a testament to the thousands to have fled. some say they have nowhere to go, nowhere is safe. he has lost his wife and six children, all of them were killed when a rocket landed on his house. >> to live is to die. bashar al-assad is a daunting task. you will die wherever you go. they say foreign aid is being provided, but we see nothing. just let us die and get it over with. >> aleppo has become the defining battle in this civil war. neither side can afford to lose, but in truth, neither i
holder today praised the libyan government's response. it's a challenging environment in which to operate but i think we have done pretty well given the circumstances in which we find ourselves and we found ourselves able to move about and do the things that we have wanted to do because of the assistance we've gotten from the libyan government as well as from some of our other allies >> sreenivasan: a u.s. house committee holds a hearing tomorrow on the consulate attack. in pakistan, a taliban gunman shot and wounded a 14-year-old activist known for promoting girls' education. malala yousufzai was hit in the head and neck during the attack in the swat valley region. doctors said the wounds were not life-threatening. yousufzai spoke out on girls' education at a u.n. children's assembly last year. the taliban called her work "an obscenity" in a statement claiming responsibility for the attack. one out of every eight people on earth is going hungry, according to a u.n. report today. that comes to 870 million people, but it's far below the figure of one billion announced in 2009. the u.n. foo
. but the spanish government complained today that move will only make things worse. >> ( translated ): what everybody needs to have in mind is that political stability is also listed on the stock exchange, and there are a lot of everyday questions for government and citizens that depend on political stability. when some actions or decisions generate political instability, it is much harder to get financing. i am not only talking about financing for public administration, but also for individuals and companies. >> sreenivasan: meanwhile, the government of greece reported unemployment reached a record of more than 25% in july. the rate among young people, 15- to-24 years old, is double that 54%. an outbreak of fungal meningitis in the u.s. has now claimed 14 lives. the centers for disease control reported the latest count today. it said a total of 170 people have been infected across eleven states. the outbreak has been linked to steroid injections for back pain that came from a specialty pharmacy in massachusetts. roughly 14,000 people received the shots. in pakistan, a 14-year-old activist
don't pay taxes and, in his words, are dependent on government, so he couldn't worry about them and their votes. >> in this case, i said something that's just completely wrong. and i absolutely believe, however, that my life has shown that i care about the 100% and that has been demonstrated throughout my life. this whole campaign is about the 100%. when i become president, it'll be about helping the 100%. >> brown: still, president obama was having none of it. >> from the day we began this campaign, we've always said that real change takes time. it takes more than one year or one term, or even one president. it takes more thanne party. it certainly can't happen if you're willing to write off half the nation before you even take office. >> brown: with the economy dominating the campaign, and with 12 million americans still unemployed, it was clear the punching and counter-punching over jobs will only grow more intense. and there's still one more monthly employment report coming-- on november 2, four days before election day. to help break down the jobs numbers, i am joined by ne
.s. government and we were in a position to tell the banks, let's go back to the social function, very important social functions. the banks have to provide in our society. and we lost that moment. >> rose: and the condition of the banks today is, of the big banks in wall street. >> well, to be frank, we really aren't sure because there's not the kind of transparency that we need. like one of my criticisms of dodd frank, we kept a lot of, for instance, these derif deriff-- derivative transparents. >> they made them a lit bit more. >> but as long as you have so much money at stake where you don't know what is at risk, you know, let me just give you one example. there are about 3 to 350 trillion dollars of derivatives that are based on libor. libor we now know is a-- number. >> explain what that is. >> the london interbank lending rate. so it's the rate, supposed to be an arm's length rate at which unone bank lends to each other. but the banks aren't lend fog each other s so what does it mean? it's a concept-- what rate do we think some other bank would lend to us. and we now know a, that they man
in the attack. they had repeatedly asked for tighter security. initially, the american government the attack to protest against an anti-muslim film. now they say it was a terrorist attack. >> the committee will come to order. >> republicans are outraged at the change. >> in fact, it was 9/11, the 11th anniversary of the greatest terrorist attack in u.s. history, in new york, pennsylvania, and at the pentagon. it was that the anniversary which caused an organization allied with al qaeda to attack and kill our personnel. >> this is not just about why the attack took place. people at the state it -- the charges that people ignored the request for further security. only months before the election, that is a very serious charge. imitt romney has put the attack at the heart of his argument that president obama does not stand for america. -- stand up for america. >> as the administration has finally conceded, these attacks were the deliver it work of terrorists. >> the committee -- for the deliberate -- these attacks were the deliberate work of terrorists. >> we have hundreds of terrorist-type acti
. >> do you think this attack on malala might help the pakastani government have the political will to take on the taliban? >> i just heard that the ministry and the minister of the interior are hoping this will give them the will to move the bank that has not happened and needs to happen if pakistan is to have an effective counterterrorism policy. >> are you worried that the american condemnation of the attack on malala could prove counterproductive when you are trying to help? >> we are not the only ones condemning. even those who are anti-american are condemning the attack. it may reverberate most negatively against one candidate for president, but he has held back from condemning the taliban himself for a reason that i think is very interesting. he says he is afraid they would retaliate against his workers in the region. that shows you the deaths of the year and intimidation that just a handful -- the death of the fear and intimidation that just a handful of terrorists have. they hate the teheran and fever and the attacking of innocent -- they hate the terror and fear and t
have is hiring that is concentrated, most recently, in the government sector. hiring that is concentrated, most recently in education and healthcare. a little bit of positive news coming from construction. but in a lot of the business services and goods-producing industries and manufacturing, things look pretty soft at this moment. >> reporter: in addition, 2,000 temporary jobs were cut, which is often looked at as a barameter of future employment. but, the average work week rose to 34-and a half hours... and employers typically boost the workload of existing staff.. before taking on new workers. with all these cross-currents, the employment situation may be but the bottom line seems to be that the economy is improving, but not nearly as quickly as most people would like. >> we lost so many jobs during the great recession, that we are slowly clawing our way out of that hole.. but still at a pretty slow pace." >> reporter: the government's next jobs report will come out just 4 days before the presidential election. by then, many voters will have made up their minds. so
for the launch of this government school. 3 million afghan girls are getting some education. it still leaves 2 million that have never been the class. but attitudes are changing. >> hi bring the women of afghanistan up to the level, the owner of the future. and they are the owner of all that is happening. >> it is a new era for these girls. now learning to play cricket. they have had to stay at home if the taliban were still in power. curious about me and keen to talk, but outside, they face many restrictions and uncertainty about their future after nato forces pull out. this is one example of the progress has been getting a high school in the past 10 years, but in the rural and less secure areas, there are millions that are not getting any kind of education and are under pressure to get married while still a school age. it is tough being a girl in afghanistan, but they are making a much bigger market. >> for more on the efforts of girls around the globe to get an education, i am joined by the ceo of women for women international. we have had two different sides of the same story, the girl's s
to continue to fund and support these governments. i think that's a very legitimate point. but on the one hand, he says -- you know, he blames obama for whatever tension there is in the u.s./israel relationship today and i would argue there's very little tension in the state-to-state relationship but a lot of tension between the prime minister of israel and the president of the united states. but all of that is entirely obama's fault. anything that's wrong with the u.s./israel relationship is obama's fault. the fact that the prime minister of israel has continued with a settlement policy which is extremely controversial in israel somehow comes no where into the equation. so we're supposed to believe on the one hand that america's supposed to lead the arab world from the front with one hand while adopting a policy toward israel that is more pro-israeli than anything any government in washington has articulated for a long time. how the two of them will go together i don't know. and for good measure, though-- and i think this is praiseworthy-- governor romney has called for a palestinian state an
what the national government is doing about police reform. >> we have to purify the police the fastest as possible. but without this motivating the other, good police, it's not going to be easy. there's too many interests. there's too many links between police and other-- and crime and other things. so you have to take it in a way that the people who are doing it don't lose their lives because they're doing it. i mean, there's something that needs to be done. everybody's conscious about it. the government is conscious about it. i'm conscious about it. you have to do it the right way in order don't hit you back stronger than what we're having the problem right now. >> cleaning up the police is critical. the capital's many small business owners feel vulnerable, as if they have no protection. one young honduran, who wants to remain anonymous, tells us what happened at his parents' restaurant last year. >> some person came in. they were a civilian who were dressing as policemen. they hit two clients. one of them died, and the other one, he survived, but he has some problem in the leg. i te
to the view he had when he ran four years ago, that a bigger government, spending more, taxing more, regulating more, if you, will trickle-down government would work. >> governor romney has a perspective that says if he cut taxes skewed towards the wealthy and roll back regulations we'll be better off. gwen: 90 minutes later, even democrats gave the debate win to roll any. but after the dust settled, what was true and what wasn't? >> it is not possible to come up with enough loopholes and deductions to only affect high-income individuals to avoid either raising the deficit or burdening the middle class. it's math. >> i'm not in favor of a $5 trillion tax cut. my plan is not to put in place any tax cut that will add to the deficit. gwen: and will today's improved jobs numbers change the political landscape again? debating, peter baker of "the new york times," dan balz of the "washington post." jeanne cummings of block berg news, and john dickerson of slate magazine and cbs news. >> award winning reporting and analysis, covering history as it happens. live in our nation's capital, thi
someone stand up for the policies they believe in, stand up for a role for government, call malarkey when it is. and i think you're going to see the democratic base of women far more energized. and you're going to see women then turn out in higher numbers which is very, very important to democratic victories. >> brown: kellyanne conway, let me come back to what you picked up. you could pick up on that but also what you said on how we approach these things. how we think about women's issues per sement because we keep hearing that the campaign could well hinge on women voters. do you think that is a wrong way of looking at it? >> it is absolutely correct that the next president and vice president will be decided ultimately by women. but it's absolutely a false premise to believe that there are quote women's issues. and that they all have to do with, you know, waste down. what about waste up, where our brains and hearts and eyes and ears are. and i think 2010 really proved it. that's where two short years after 56% of women gave a strat spheric barack obama 56% of the vote, was unheard of fo
measure whether your plan is narrowly tailored. >> and how do you represent a state government. how was the court in 2003 when affirmative action was upheld then, and now there's a possibility it won't be because of the terms of this particular case? what's different about the court? >> well, the composition of the court has changed. the grutter decision was 5-4 which chief justice ren quest was chief. it was a decision by justice sandra day, o'connor, who was in the courtroom today of the guest seats of the justices. >> ifill: is that unusual? >> she has come occasion amy but i think she has a special interest in this case. you have new justices. you have four new justices on the court. but with the absence of justice kagan in this case, you're dealing with eight justices, the possibility of a 4-4 split. also, justice kennedy has always been the key vote in these race-based cases. he asked very few questions today, so he didn't really reveal-- >> ifill: you couldn't really read him. >> no, you couldn't. but i will say this about justice kennedy in these types of cases -- he has nev
've got to tell their government to stop cyber attacking the united states. >> reporter: huawei aggressively pushed back. the company says the intelligence committee provided no clear evidence of wrong doing and it dismissed the report as politically motivated. a spokesman for huawei says the company is owned by its employees and its work around the world is trusted and proven. >> our procurements from us companies totaled $6.6 billion. that's tens of thousands of jobs. these recommendations put at risk american jobs. >> reporter: huawei appears to operate as a purely commercial enterprise, but it is hard to sort out who owns the company and how much of it. the intelligence committee report concludes some chinese telecomm equipment secretly transmitted information back to china. that's what concerns u.s. cyber- security experts. they fear the chinese government could use huawei's technology to access sensitive information. >> i think it is a legitimate concern. now the question is how much that concern is being used in the u.s. to block a much larger range of investments, becaus
. the election is tightening up, which means anybody who is elected is likely to govern from the center, and attack the fiscal cliff. and so you have to say in a low return environment, shares of multinational companies with growing earnings and dividends are probably not a bad place to be. but you want to buy when the markets are down, not when they're up, and you want to sell low quality, buy high quality, and buy them on corrections, not after big moves. i would not be surprised if you have a little bit more of a correction right here. >> susie: so let's talk a little more about this correction. it feels like a correction. between what's going on with oil prices going lower, some of these earnings reports that we've been getting. so what are the risks ahead, and is this a buying opportunity? one strategist saying toy that he's pretty upbeat because with central banks around the world pouring money into the financial system, it's kind of hard to see that the global economy will freeze up. so what's your take on this? risky period or a buying opportunity? >> well, look, it remains risk
that government taking 28% of family and businesses income is enough. president obama thinks that the government ought to be able to take as much as 44.8% of a small business's income. look, if you tax every person in successful small business making over $250,000 at 100%, it only runs the government for 98 days. if everybody who paid income taxes last year including successful small businesses doubled their income taxes this year we would still have a $300 billion deficit. you see, there aren't enough rich people and small businesses to tax to pay for all their spending. and so the next time you hear them say don't worry about it, we'll get a few wealtheer people to pay their fair share, watch out middle class. the tax bill is coming to you. that's why we're saying we need fundamental tax reform. let's take a look at this way. 8 out of 10 businesses file their taxes as individuals, not as corporations. where i come from, overseas, which is lake superior, the canadians they drop their tax rates to 15%. the average tax rate on businesses in industrialized world is 25% and the president wants the
that neighbors, not just government, should help those who are struggling. >> whether consciously or not, you're really socialized to think, as a mormon, these functions, these kind of welfare state functions, are not government functions. they are functions to be done by the voluntary sector. it's this sort of tocquevillian idea that, you know, people take care of each other at the community level. this isn't what the central government does for people. >> narrator: romney served four years as a bishop and many more as a senior mormon leader. then he decided to turn to politics. >> the reason mormons do get interested in public service comes out of a sense that we have a mission. >> narrator: for romney and other mormons, america holds a special place. >> i think romney has a deep commitment to the united states and to the americas, because mormons do believe it's a holy land and honor the constitution as coming from god. >> we believe that the united states of america is that place that had to be free so that god could bring truth back to earth. and we revere it for that purpose. >> and jos
attitudes women have actually on size of government, issues and government policy generally, and one thing i think was interesting in this -- after the presidential debate, you saw on some polls the gender gap closeup when romney didn't talk about women at all and when they obsessed over it in the convention to me that was a sign that women like all other voters are really judging on the most important and central issue in this campaign, and that is the economy, when romney was more credible on that and gained with everyone including women. >> rose: chuck todd, will fact checkers tomorrow morning look at this and examine this and find out and suggest that somebody was either misleading or, quote, lying? >> i don't think there are any lies in there, my favorite part is when, you know, there is that one point where you have joe biden saying 97 percent of small businesses make $250,000 or less and paul ryan insisting 1 million businesses are affected by that and that is they are both ride but, right but want to use different numbers one wants to use raw data and the other percentage to make it
, this is charlie rose. >> rose: at the clinton global initiative business and government and ngos were in attendance to talk about big ideas, big problems. >> and here at cgi you've made impressive commitments in this fight. we are especially honored to be joined by advocates who dedicate their lives and at times risk their lives to liberate victims and help them recover. >> rose: we begin with the recent conversation with the president of mexico, felipe calderon. you headed up the g20. what was that experience for you as an opportunity to engage others and focusing on big global problems? >> let me start by remembering the meeting we had in france in november 2011. it was a very disappointing one. we finished that without agreements, even without a sense of direction. so the problem seemed not only serious but also out of control. and then we started a process when mexico took over the head of the g20. we started a multiple processes in the sense that we beginning several ministerial meetings in order to put in a commonplace the different positions and try to close the gap between the
that he has tried to make about the red line and backing the obama administration and the u.s. government into a corner to make a particular statement about these red lines. he has not been successful at that even with his speech at the u.n. i raise that because the jewish vote does matter. let's be frank about it. more important or as important, and jewish money matters. the biggest giver in this campaign on the other side is they do, -- is a jew. the issue of israel is important as is always in u.s. foreign policy. how do you think that plays out in the election, particularly given that netanyahu has not been successful, but a significant number of jews who feel that obama has been disrespectful to netanyahu? >> let me back up on two quick points. i think it is important to distinguish the jewish money from pro-use real money. there are huge numbers of jews like me in the jewish community who have very diverse views on israel, who do not support u.s. military aid to israel, who don't support giving israel the kind of diplomatic support at the united nations, providing the kind of impuni
and z.t.e. the house intelligence committee reported both have close ties to the government of china. it said using their components in u.s. computer networks could let them steal trade secrets or even shut down vital systems in a time of crisis. the two firms denied any such association to the chinese government. venezuela's leftist president hugo chavez will serve another six years after winning reelection sunday. his margin of victory was ten points, the narrowest in his 14 years in power. it was a bitterly fought race against challenger henrique capriles, who conceded defeat. chavez welcomed that concession last night, as supporters poured into the streets and surrounded the presidential palace. he addressed them from the balcony. >> my gratitude to the right wing candidate and his campaign managers who announced to the country that they recognize our victory. this is a very important step for peace in venezuela, for our coexistence. >> sreenivasan: chavez is expected to step up his push for socialism, and to continue his longstanding criticism of u.s. foreign policy. turkey reta
partners, owners and the government, so we have -- >> rose: government as a partner? >> in many cases. you know, they are -- they own the land and will be part and parcel of an ownership sometimes and they will diversify and difficult vest themselves of it. so we haven't found any difficulty. in the construction of it, we have had to really monitor it carefully to get the quality, but they eventually do reach that level of what -- >> rose: you mean things like importing marble from italy and that kind of stuff. >> they will but they want to use a lot of their own materials and their own suppliers, et cetera. so we have been able to reach the level of quality that is standard within the four systems, you know, realm of our control. >> rose: do you love the business? do you love it? >> i do. >> rose: do you get excited when you see a hotel? >> i do, because it is such a dynamic business, because you are dealing with people who work and people who use it, and the reaction you get from both of those is always a stimulating part of business and it is always different. >> rose: and how is it ch
measure. that's a little bit scary, too, particularly because it guarantees local governments $5 billion a year for realignment. a constitutional spending commitment on a temporary tax. that's kind of uncertain, as well. >> belva: we have so many hot issues, we have to move to one that is really hot, because it is burning the pocketbooks of the people of the state, and that's gas prices that seem to be gone a bit wild. >> to a record price in san francisco today, probably around the state by tomorrow. the average price in the bay area is $4.55. that is 16 cents more than yesterday. 37 cents more than a week ago and 70 cents higher than a year ago. so, it is a huge problem for the state of california. there are six primary factors that are contributing to this and they are very important. one is the chevron refinery that's 1 out of 8 gallons of fuel in the state of california. that's out of service for many months to come there was a major pipeline that chevron owns and operates that has been shut down since the middle of september, out of service, denies amount of crude oil, cutting down
of meetings with customers and as well as high government officials, and i could see that they're putting in a similar program which is strongly targeted on the infrastructure side. so i'm confident that we will see growth coming back most likely at the end of the fourth quarter, i believe. and the u.s., atz as i just said, is doing a little better than we originally thought driven by the two strong segments, automotive and aerospace. >> susie: how are you factoring demand forecast when the international monetary fund saying today there are serious risks of a global recession? things are slowing down in china. how are you meet those kinds of high demands in the way that you're forecasting? >> look, we see the industry, and there's a lot of industry that is are wanting more and more aluminum. we see in the u.s., for instance, the automotive industry, not only growing but more strongly growing on the aluminum side, driven by regulations for lower emissions. and stronger kuflt mersensitivity for fuel efficiencies. and these two things come together and bring substantial amount of aluminum g
. by suggesting he wasn't trying to say that the entire government didn't know about the security questions. whether there should be more or less security. he was trying to suggest that the president and he had not been directly advised of these requests for additional security assets. in benghazi. gwen: and yet we've seen mitt romney and paul ryan continuing to talk about this every single day. which is interesting. because we are told that americans aren't voting on foreign policy issues. and yet here is one that won't go away. >> it's interesting also because this issue is -- is an issue that until quite recently, president obama had a huge lead against -- gwen: you were saying osama bin laden and the conversation would end. >> the polls do suggest they are chipping away at that. it's an interesting strategy, though, because as one republican strategist who's worried about it told me, when you start playing on those issues, you are playing on the commander in chief's turf. and the only time that that has ever really worked and made a difference in an election was with jimmy carter. gwen:
was 23 and 24. >> as a reporter? >> as a reporter. it was the usual thing in mexico. the government would say what you could say on the air and what you couldn't say on the air. i decided i didn't want to be that kind of reporter so i sold everything and came to the united states. just imagine that now i can talk to anyone without asking permission for anything. i had to leave my country because of that. it used to be said that the powerful and the rich never leave their country, only those who need possibilities and those who are poor and those who are ambitious leave their countries. that's exactly what happened with me. i came here because i had to come here. something pushed me out of mexico and something pulled me from the united states. now i have two passports, but honestly i have to thank this country because it gave me all the wonderful opportunities. if i would have stayed in mexico, i don't know what would have happened but i would have been a very poor, sad and probably censored journalist. >> why did your parents come? >> my parents came in the 1940s and it was because my fat
-poverty schools, schools where at least 40% of the students qualify for government-subsidized lunch. >> we looked at about 40 different variables, and we put that into a big statistical analysis and said we want factors that are highly reliable and also yield a large number of kids in trouble. >> narrator: and within this chaotic tangle of data, the team found something revealing. >> and basically out of this mix, four came out really strong. and that was our sort of eureka moment. i saw kids waving their hands, saying, "help-- help me stay on track." >> narrator: the data showed that if a sixth-grade child in a high-poverty school attends school less than 80% of the time, or fails math or english, or receives an unsatisfactory behavior grade in a core course, that absent effective intervention, there is a 75% chance that they will drop out of high school. >> it may seem far less than rocket science, but it's something that in fact schools by and large have not paid attention to. >> a 90, a 91... >> narrator: schools have long collected statistics on absences, behavior and of course grades, but m
Search Results 0 to 46 of about 47 (some duplicates have been removed)